Treating Opioid Addiction in Primary Care Benefits Both Patients and Cash-Strapped Medical Practices

Ella Castle

Annals of Family Medicine: Treating Opioid Addiction in Primary Care Benefits Both Patients and Cash-Strapped Medical Practices

PR Newswire

ANN ARBOR, Mich., Nov. 11, 2020

ANN ARBOR, Mich., Nov. 11, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Buprenorphine-based treatment for opioid addiction is in short supply in many areas of the United States. And while many physicians want to offer it, clinics are unsure how to offer buprenorphine therapy in a financially sustainable way. Cost and revenue analysis from a team of Harvard Medical School researchers finds that even cash-strapped primary practices in high-poverty rural and urban communities can offer financially sustainable

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Hospital bills for uninsured COVID patients are covered, but no one tells them

Ella Castle

When Darius Settles died from COVID-19 on the Fourth of July, his family and the city of Nashville, Tennessee, were shocked. Even the mayor noted the passing of a 30-year-old without any underlying conditions — one of the city’s youngest fatalities at that point.

Settles was also uninsured and had just been sent home from an emergency room for the second time, and he was worried about medical bills. An investigation into his death found that, like many uninsured COVID-19 patients, he had never been told that cost shouldn’t be a concern.

Back at the end of June, Settles and

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The truckers who keep India’s coronavirus patients breathing

Ella Castle

SELAQUI, India (Reuters) – Subhas Kumar Yadav has fought fear, deadlines and hunger to truck liquid oxygen from a factory in India’s Himalayan foothills to hospitals in the northern plains during the coronavirus epidemic.

Subhas Kumar Yadav, a truck driver who ferries liquid oxygen from a Linde India factory to hospitals, poses in front of a tanker carrying liquid oxygen along a road in Selaqui in the Dehradun district of the northern state of Uttarakhand, India October 29, 2020. Picture taken October 29, 2020. REUTERS/Devjyot Ghoshal

The worst time, he said, was in the weeks after the federal government imposed

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Study in Nature Medicine Shows Superior Outcomes for Patients in The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Paradigm-Shifting Beat AML Clinical Trial

Ella Castle

RYE BROOK, N.Y., Oct. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Patients participating in The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s (LLS) groundbreaking precision medicine Beat AML Master Clinical Trial had superior outcomes compared to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who opted for standard chemotherapy treatment, according to findings published today in the prestigious Nature Medicine journal.

The Beat AML trial achieved its primary endpoint by showing genomic analysis of the leukemia cells to identify AML subtypes can be completed within an unprecedented seven days, giving patients, caregivers and their doctors ample time to make a more personalized treatment decision without risking the patient’s chance

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Lilly Stops Antibody Trial in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients

Ella Castle

Editor’s note: Find the latest COVID-19 news and guidance in Medscape’s Coronavirus Resource Center.

Eli Lilly announced it will halt its ACTIV-3 trial evaluating the antibody bamlanivimab in combination with remdesivir for people hospitalized with COVID-19, after new evidence regarding efficacy emerged.

The new data from the National Institutes of Health suggest that the experimental neutralizing antibody therapy does not offer significant clinical benefit for people with more advanced COVID-19 illness, according to a company statement.

Eli Lilly also announced it plans to continue its other trials evaluating the antibody, including those assessing a potential role in treating people in

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Dentist who extracted a patient’s tooth while riding a hoverboard sentenced to 12 years

Ella Castle

An Alaska dentist was also filmed riding a hoverboard during a procedure on a patient who was under anesthesia was convicted on 46 counts of defrauding the federal Medicaid program has been sentenced to 12 years in prison.

Anchorage Superior Court Judge Michael Wolverton found Seth Lookhart, 35, guilty Jan. 17 of pressuring patients to needlessly undergo intravenous sedation to bill Medicaid for the service.

Wolverton on Monday suspended eight years of the sentence, leaving Lookhart 12 years of prison time to serve.

The state requested that the court order Lookhart to pay more than $2 million in restitution for

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Alaska dentist, Seth Lookhart, who extracted a patient’s tooth on a hoverboard sentenced to 12 years in jail

Ella Castle

Seth Lookhart, 35, was convicted on 46 felony and misdemeanor counts in January, including medical assistance fraud, scheme to defraud, illegal practice of dentistry and reckless endangerment.

Anchorage Superior Court Judge Michael Wolverton sentenced Lookhart on Monday to serve 20 years in jail with eight years suspended, the statement said. That means Lookhart will serve 12 years behind bars. He also cannot practice dentistry during his 10 years of probation.

Lookhart apologized for his actions while reading from a prepared statement.

“Looking back, I can’t say exactly when I began to go off course,” he said, CNN affiliate KTUU reported.
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This toothless Chihuahua is comforting scared patients at a California dentist office

Ella Castle

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Kismet, a 13-year-old Chihuahua and a big fan of treats and back scratches, spends her days at Corte Madera Family Dentistry, where she offers cuddles to patients who could use a little stress relief while having their teeth worked on.

Dr. Cameron Garrett, the office’s dentist, and his wife, Debra Garrett, the dental hygienist, adopted Kismet in July. Since then, she’s been a great addition to their family practice in Corte Madera.

“After working … Read More

Dentist: Closure of practices impacts patients’ oral health

Ella Castle

JOHNSTON, R.I. (WPRI) ─ A Johnston dentist believes dentistry is an essential business, but argues that it hasn’t been treated as such throughout the coronavirus pandemic.

Rupesh Udeshi, dentist and co-owner of Dental Associates of Rhode Island, said the months his practice was closed had a big impact on the health of many of his patients.

“We’ve had a great backlog and problems that were minor, that have become major. The patient may have just had a cavity or needed a filling, but we haven’t seen them and it’s now more severe and it’s a root canal, and some people

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